Guidelines for voice work

Teaching has taught me a lot about the average person’s conception of vocal training. Beginning students expect a teacher to talk about breathing, tone, and projection. Yet many of them - even those who have had vocal training before - are surprised by certain aspects of my classes.

They don’t expect me to ask questions about their health, talk about relaxation, inquire about their earliest vocal memories, or assign yoga exercises. Many are surprised that they feel uncomfortable talking about or exploring their voices. Others only want a few simple tips they can use on their own to suddenly bring their vocal skills from an amateur to a professional level.

As I have learned more about the expectations of my students, I have slowly developed some guidelines for beginners.

Guidelines for Voice Work

  • The voice is deeply personal. Along with our physical appearance, our voice is one of the primary ways in which we express ourselves to the world. Our voices reflect our upbringing, social influences, and self-image.
  • Voice work involves releasing tension and engaging the breath. Most voice problems are caused when some muscles are too tense and others are not working hard enough. Voice training can help you retrain your muscles, relaxing some and engaging others.
  • Voice work takes time. Be patient with yourself, and do not expect a quick fix. Poor vocal habits may take years to develop, and they will not disappear overnight.
  • Voice work involves replacing habit with choice. This requires 1) knowledge 2) attention 3) change and 4) repetition.
  • Voice work requires regular practice. You will get the most out of vocal training if you practice regularly. It is more effective to practice for 10-20 minutes several times a day than to practice for one hour once a week.

Download my Guidelines for Voice Work as a PDF.

Yoga for your face

So I’ve taken my love for yoga (which I’ve blogged about before) to a new level. My inspiration is a book I got for Chrstimas: The Yoga Face: Eliminate Wrinkles with the Ultimate Natural Facelift by Annelise Hagen. Of course, I didn’t get it to zap wrinkles, but to warm up my face for singing.

The author is a yoga instructor and teaches a class called Yoga Face at the New York Health and Raquet Club. See her class in action on this video clip from NBC Today. Her book is full of specific exercises for toning and relaxing the facial muscles. Many of them teach you how to isolate tiny muscles that we don’t usually activate alone, a skill singers can use for refining vocal technique and for building a wider range of facial expressions.

One of the things that sets this book apart is that it’s not entirely focused on the face. Unlike a lot of similar works, Yoga Face also includes basic exercises that are generally relaxing, including a lot of inverted poses and poses that free up the breath. This is ideal for singers, who can turn to it to warm up body, mind, and breath. Plus, the emphasis on basic postures makes the book accessible to beginners and advanced yogis alike.

If you’re interested in facial exercises, here’s a list of additional resources, including books, website, and YouTube clips.