Learning to sing: Why you need a voice teacher

A lot of people come to my blog looking for information on how to sing. So far, my posts have focused more on my journey as a singer or on tips for people who are already singers or students of singing. Look for that focus to change somewhat in the coming months.

“Learning to Sing” series

I’ve written before that one of my goals is to eventually teach singing. I’ve taught voice lessons before (though not recently), so it seems like a natural topic to writing about here. After all, this is a site about finding the singing voice - not having it, not showing it off, not becoming famous for it. It’s a site about the process of improving as a singer. So why not start at the very beginning?

Why you need a voice teacher

I’ll give specific singing tips in later posts. For now, you should know that the best way to learn to sing is with a teacher. Yes, you can pick up some knowledge online, watch American Idol, listen to recordings, and sing along to your favorite songs. But here are a few reasons why you should consider finding a teacher if you’re serious about singing.

  • A voice teacher can hear things you can’t. It’s tempting to think that nobody knows your voice as well as you do, but it’s actually not true. Your vocal cords are located in your throat, and the sounds they make resonate in your throat, mouth, head, and chest. Your body is a musical instrument, and your ears are attached to it. That means they can’t possibly hear your voice like others do. They’re too close! Singers have to learn the sensations of good singing and rely on the expert ears of a teacher.
  • A voice teacher can see you sing. No, a teacher can’t see your vocal cords, but he or she can see a lot of your vocal instrument: your face, jaw, tongue, neck, ribcage, and abdomen. Good posture is essential for singing. A teacher can also spot signs of physical tension that can affect your sound. Another common problem teachers catch are distracting movements or “tics” like rocking back and forth while singing, clenching your hands, or standing on your toes for high notes.
  • A voice teacher can guide your learning process. You could read a thousand books on singing and never improve as a singer, but a teacher can guide you in a way that knowledge can’t. A teacher, a book, or a DVD can all tell you how to breathe, but only a teacher can tell you if you’re doing it right or not. Also, a teacher will tailor lessons to your specific needs. Is your breathing fine, but your neck is tense? Do you have a huge vocal range, but places where the voice breaks? A wise teacher will determine what you need to work on and in what order and will match his or her teaching to your learning style.
  • A voice teacher can help you work towards your goals. Do you want to join a choir, audition for a musical, become a pop star, or sing opera? Or maybe you just like singing and want to improve your voice. Whatever your goals are, a teacher can help you move in the right direction. He or she can also give you feedback on whether your goals are realistic. If they aren’t, your teacher can help you set new goals that are within your reach.
  • A voice teacher can open up a whole new world! A lot of people start singing lessons without knowing quite what to expect. Singing seems simple enough, but it connects so many other areas. The best singers and teachers draw on knowledge from so many fields besides music: anatomy, bodywork (like yoga), health, psychology, speech and language, history, poetry, acting, theater, etc. You might get into singing for one reason, only to discover a new passion.

Have a question about singing? Send me an email.

Look for more posts in the “Learning to Sing” series on topics such as: